World No Tobacco Day 2016: “Get Ready for Plain Packaging,” says WHO

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According to the World Health Organization, tobacco-related illness is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. Their statistics show that about one person dies from a tobacco-caused disease every six seconds, which is equivalent to almost 6 million deaths each year. The numbers are increasing, currently forecast to rise to more than 8 million people a year by 2030, with more than 80 percent of these preventable deaths occurring among people living in low- and middle-income countries.

With those chilling statistics firmly in mind, the WHO has declared May 31 to be World No Tobacco Day. The theme for this year is to encourage the transition to plain packaging for tobacco products worldwide as a way to decrease tobacco use. This strategy may seem too simple to be effective, yet its relatively recent implementation in Australia has already shown successful results.

 

Here’s a the official World No Tobacco Day 2016 video featuring WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan, followed by their news release.

 

WHO News Release 

Recent moves to introduce plain (standardized) packaging of tobacco products can save lives by reducing demand for tobacco products, according to WHO and the WHO Framework Convention on Tobacco Control Secretariat (WHO FCTC).

Plain packaging of tobacco products restricts or prohibits the use of logos, colours, brand images and promotional information on packaging other than brand and product names displayed in a standard colour and font style.

In December 2012, Australia became the first country to fully implement plain packaging. On 20 May 2016, France and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland each began implementation of plain packaging. Ireland is also preparing to introduce the measure, while other countries are exploring the option.

How Plain Packaging Works

“Plain packaging reduces the attractiveness of tobacco products. It kills the glamour, which is appropriate for a product that kills people,” says WHO Director-General Dr Margaret Chan. “It restricts tobacco advertising and promotion. It limits misleading packaging and labelling. And it increases the effectiveness of health warnings.”

Plain packaging is recommended in WHO FCTC guidelines as part of a comprehensive approach to tobacco control that includes large graphic health warnings and comprehensive bans on tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship.

Australia’s Story

Smoking in Australia has been steadily declining for years. Australia introduced plain packaging, in conjunction with new and enlarged health warnings, in 2012. Between December 2012 and September 2015, there was an additional 0.55 percentage point fall in smoking prevalence among those aged 14 and above attributable to the packaging changes, according Australia’s post-implementation review. This equates to more than 108,000 people quitting, not relapsing or not starting to smoke during that period.

Dr Oleg Chestnov, WHO’s Assistant Director-General for Noncommunicable Diseases (NCDs) and Mental Health, says Australia’s plain packaging results demonstrate the great potential of the measure. “Plain packaging can reduce consumption of tobacco products, as clearly seen in Australia. It offers a powerful tool to countries as part of a comprehensive approach to tackle the scourge of tobacco use,” says Dr Chestnov.

The theme of this year’s World No Tobacco Day – Get ready for plain packaging – highlights this new trend in global efforts to control tobacco products, which kill almost 6 million people annually, notes Dr Douglas Bettcher, WHO’s Director for the Prevention of NCDs.

Defying the Tobacco Industry

“Plain packaging is going global as more and more countries seek the important health gains it can bring to communities,” says Dr Bettcher. “The tobacco industry has been getting ready for plain packaging for some time, conducting massive misinformation campaigns to block the measure.”

“So it is encouraging to see more and more countries defy the industry’s tactics and implement plain packaging to reduce demand for tobacco products and put the health of their populations first.”

To mark World No Tobacco Day, WHO is launching a new guide to plain packaging of tobacco products, which gives governments the latest evidence and guidance on implementing the measure.

“Most governments are committed to curbing the tobacco epidemic and reducing tobacco-related harm, such as deaths from cancers, heart and lung diseases,” says Dr Vera da Costa e Silva, Head of the WHO FCTC Secretariat. “It is vital they have access to evidence-based, effective guidance that can support their efforts to protect the health of their populations.”

Editor’s Note

Tobacco-related illness is one of the biggest public health threats the world has ever faced. Approximately 1 person dies from a tobacco-caused disease every 6 seconds, equivalent to almost 6 million people a year. This is forecast to rise to more than 8 million people a year by 2030, with more than 80% of these preventable deaths occurring among people living in low-and middle-income countries.

Tobacco use is one of the largest preventable causes of noncommunicable diseases (NCDs). Tobacco control represents a powerful tool in improving health in communities and in achieving the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). SDG target 3.4 is to reduce premature deaths from NCDs by one-third by 2030, including cardiovascular and chronic respiratory diseases, cancers and diabetes. NCDs accounted for the deaths of 16 million people under the age of 70 years in 2012 – 82% of which occurred in developing countries.

The WHO Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC) entered into force in 2005. Parties are obliged to take a number of steps to reduce demand and supply for tobacco products. Actions addressed in the Convention include protecting people from exposure to tobacco smoke, banning tobacco advertising, promotion and sponsorship, banning sales to minors, requiring health warnings on tobacco packaging, promoting tobacco cessation, increasing tobacco taxes and creating a national coordinating mechanism for tobacco control. There are 180 Parties to the Convention.

For more information, contact:

Paul Garwood
Telephone: +41 22 7911578
Mobile: +41-79 603 72 94
Email: garwoodp@who.int

Christian Lindmeier
Telephone: +41 22 79 11948
Mobile: +41 795 006 552
Email: lindmeierch@who.int

How To Avoid Listeria Infection

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20160504_132855With repeated massive recalls of frozen fruits and vegetables—some organic, some not—becoming commonplace, consumers are wondering about the best ways to avoid illness from food-borne disease. Below is an article I wrote for Vision.org about what you can do to help keep yourself and your loved ones safe (shared with permission). Wash your produce, keep your kitchen clean, know your farmer . . . but you will find the most important, long-term solution at the end of the article.

Avoiding Food-Borne Disease

Salmonella and campylobacter contamination seem to be on the rise, with a rash of news stories about disease and death stemming from contaminated foods as diverse as spinach and chicken, bell peppers and eggs.

According to Dr. Catharina Berge, an international expert in pathology and zoonotic disease, this is not simply due to increased news coverage. “The risks have changed. There are pathogens in produce, lettuce, peanut butter, even water,” she told a group of raw milk producers gathering at Chico State University in October 2013. She described the prevalence of salmonella in the United States, where contaminated poultry had recently sickened hundreds of consumers. “It’s everywhere,” she warned, commenting that she has even found it in water where no animals are nearby.

Making the situation even worse, Berge says, “humans are becoming more isolated from production animals, produce, wildlife and pets—immune systems are weakened. . . . One in six people in the United States is sick each year from zoonotic foodborne diseases.” In fact, Berge adds, “bacterial disease is the number one killer around the world.”

Disease-causing food-borne bacteria include salmonella, campylobacter, listeria, cryptosporidium and E. coli, among others. And these bacteria are becoming resistant to antibiotics, leaving some infections untreatable.

How does one avoid these diseases? According to Berge, prevention is the best defense. In the kitchen, cross-contamination is a big factor. Thoroughly clean knives, cutting boards, countertops, hands and all surfaces after preparing meats for cooking. “Do you have vegetables out while you’re prepping chicken?” she asks. Six to 72 hours later, she says, maybe as much as a week down the road—you may find yourself ill with food-borne illness.

Be sure to wash all produce well before eating, and even before cutting (as slicing through contaminated skin can contaminate the inside of the produce). Many experts do not recommend washing meat before cooking, as this can cause miniscule sprays of contaminated water to infect other surfaces far beyond what seems to be possible. Instead, if you cook the meat to an internal temperature of 165 degrees, most pathogenic bacteria inside and out will be killed. Put cooked meat on a clean plate using clean utensils.

Food safety begins long before kitchen prep, though—an important first step is making sure that your raw materials are safe. Fresher is better, and knowing where your food comes from can help determine the risk of disease. In the United States, for example, Federal laws allow up to 7.5 percent of chicken meat for sale to be contaminated with pathogenic bacteria. Since animals shed pathogenic bacteria at a much higher level when stressed, it’s safer to avoid meat, eggs or dairy products from concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) with overcrowded, unsanitary conditions, opting instead for pastured or free-range products.  Well-treated animals have a lesser chance of stress-related bacterial shedding.

And the best thing we can do for long-term prevention? Maintain a healthy immune system. A healthy immune system, says Berge, can keep us from contracting the diseases caused by the pathogenic bacteria that are all around us. Our immune systems are tied to friendly intestinal bacteria that battle pathogenic food-borne bacteria. Getting enough sleep, eating healthfully, exercising moderately, not smoking, drinking alcohol only in moderation, avoiding undue stress and unnecessary antibiotics, and getting closer to nature are important strategies that can help build our immunity to food-borne bacterial illness.

 

Until next time ~

CRF Frozen Foods Voluntary Recall: All Frozen Vegetable and Fruit Products Due To Possible Health Risk

As a precaution, CRF Frozen Foods of Pasco, Washington is expanding its voluntary recall of frozen organic and traditional fruits and vegetables. We are performing this voluntary recall in cooperation with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) because these products have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes.

Listeria is not a major issue for those with a strong immune system, but it has become more of a problem in recent years as our immune systems seem to have weakened. Symptoms of listeriosis include fever, headache, muscle aches, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, according to the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC). Listeria infection can also cause miscarriages and stillbirths among pregnant women. Because seven people were hospitalized with listeriosis, a massive recall of frozen foods that may be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes is in effect. (Two of those people have died, but the CDC says it was due to factors other than Listeria.) I’ve reposted the complete list from the FDA below.

If you’re wondering how to protect yourself and your loved ones from food-borne disease like Listeria, click here to read an article on the subject. 

*****************

Consumers who purchased these products may return them to the store where they were purchased for a refund, or simply discard them. Consumers with questions may call the company’s consumer hotline at 844-483-3866, Monday through Friday, 8:00 am to 8:00 pm Eastern Standard Time.

CRF had already suspended operations at its Pasco, Washington facility as of Monday morning, April 25, 2016 following the initial voluntary recall, so a thorough review could be conducted.

CDC has informed CRF Frozen Foods that the government has identified seven people from three states who became ill and were hospitalized due to Listeria. Some of these illnesses have been linked to consuming CRF-manufactured or processed products. CDC also informed us that, sadly, two of these individuals later died, but that Listeria was not the cause of death in either person.

All retailers who received the products have been contacted.

Products being recalled may have been purchased in all fifty U.S. states and the following Canadian Provinces: British Columbia, Alberta, Manitoba, Saskatchewan.


CRF-Branded Products
Instructions to Consumer > All Best By Dates, All Frozen Vegetables and Fruit Items
Best By will include the following dates 04.26.16 thru 04.26.18
All Codes are found on the Back of the Bag in the following location down the back seam

Brand Container Size UPC
Bybee’s
Bybee’s Big House Blend 30lb AZ#85
Bybee Foods Organic California Broccoli Florets 4lb 4635800050
Bybee’s Best 1″ Cut Green Beans 20lb 4635800012
Bybee Foods Cut Green Beans 50lb 205050004485CR
Bybee Foods Organic Petite Whole Green Beans 5lb 5711000146
Bybee’s Best Whole Green Beans 15lb 4635800018
Bybee’s Best Cut Corn 20lb 4635800010
Bybee’s Best Cut Corn 55lb 45720025
Bybee Foods Cut Corn 50lb 132
Bybee Foods Organic Supersweet White Corn 5lb 5711000148
Bybee’s Best White Cut Corn 20lb 4635800034
Bybee Foods Northwest Growers Select Supersweet Cut Corn 5lb 4635800043
Bybee’s Best Green Peas 20lb 4635800011
Bybee Foods Green Peas 50lb 155000007785CR
Bybee Foods Organic Sweet Baby Peas 5lb 5711000145
Bybee’s Best Peas & Carrots 20lb 4635800013
Bybee’s Best Mixed Vegetables 20lb 4635800014
Bybee Foods Organic Mixed Vegetables 5lb 4635800051
Bybee Foods Organic Mixed Vegetables with Shelled Edamame 5lb 4635800001
Bybee Foods Organic Chopped Kale 56oz 4635800054
Bybee Foods Organic Steamers Roasted Red Potato & Vegetable Medley 12oz 4635800041
Bybee Foods Northwest Growers Select Chopped Spinach 56oz 4635800035
Bybee Foods Organic Steamers Sweet Potatoes 12oz 4635800052
Bybee Foods Organic Chopped Onions 45lb R02303
Columbia River Organics
Columbia River Organics Organic Blueberries 10oz 5711000125
Columbia River Organics Organic Bounty Blend 10oz 4635800024
Columbia River Organics Organic Broccoli & Cheddar Cheese 10oz 5711000140
Columbia River Organics Organic Broccoli Florets 10oz 5711000117
Columbia River Organics Organic Butternut Squash 10oz 5711000141
Columbia River Organics Organic California Harvest 10oz 5711000122
Columbia River Organics Organic Cranberries 10oz 4635800026
Columbia River Organics Organic Cut Green Beans 10oz 5711000103
Columbia River Organics Organic Diced Onions 10oz 5711000116
Columbia River Organics Organic Edamame 10oz 5711000120
Columbia River Organics Organic French Cut Green Beans 10oz 5711000105
Columbia River Organics Organic Garden Stir Fry 10oz 5711000124
Columbia River Organics Organic Gardener’s Blend 10oz 5711000114
Columbia River Organics Organic Peaches 10oz 5711000129
Columbia River Organics Organic Peas & Carrots 10oz 5711000112
Columbia River Organics Organic Peas & pearl Onions 10oz 5711000113
Columbia River Organics Organic Petite Peas 10oz 5711000109
Columbia River Organics Organic Petite Whole Green Beans 10oz 5711000102
Columbia River Organics Organic Potato Medley 10oz 4635800025
Columbia River Organics Organic Raspberries 10oz 5711000130
Columbia River Organics Organic Shelled Edamame 10oz 5711000119
Columbia River Organics Organic Spinach 10oz 5711000121
Columbia River Organics Organic Strawberries 10oz 5711000131
Columbia River Organics Organic Super Sweet White Corn 10oz 5711000107
Columbia River Organics Organic Sweet Cherries 10oz 5711000127
Columbia River Organics Organic Sweet Potatoes 10oz 4635800023
Columbia River Organics Organic Sweet Yellow Corn 10oz 5711000106
Northwest Growers Select
Northwest Growers Select Broccoli Cuts 20lb 4635800046
Northwest Growers Select Cob Corn 96ct 4635800049
Northwest Growers Select Cut Corn 20lb 5711000163
Northwest Growers Select Cut Corn 30lb 5711000165
Northwest Growers Select Cut Corn 55lb 45730579
Northwest Growers Select French Cut Green Beans 20lb 25100
Northwest Growers Select Cut Green Beans 20lb 57110000184
Northwest Growers Select 1/2″ Cut Green Beans 30lb 08110
Northwest Growers Select Cut Green Beans 30lb 5711000186
Northwest Growers Select Cut Green Beans 50lb 4635800020
Northwest Growers Select Organic Cut Green Beans 30lb 5711000187
Northwest Growers Select Organic Cut Green Beans 50lb 4635800042
Northwest Growers Select Cut Italian Beans 20lb 4635800031
Northwest Growers Select Diced Carrots 20lb 20100
Northwest Growers Select Organic Diced Carrots 50lb 4635800019
Northwest Grower’s Select Diced Onions 45lb 19190
Northwest Growers Select Fine Whole Green Beans 4lb 10150
Northwest Growers Select Green Peas 20lb 5711000152
Northwest Growers Select Green Peas 55lb 45721084
Northwest Growers Select Organic Peas 30lb 5711000155
Northwest Growers Select Mixed Vegetables 20lb 4635800044
Northwest Growers Select Pearl Onions 20lb 22100
Northwest Growers Select Peas & Carrots 20lb 14100
Northwest Growers Select Petite Whole Green Beans 15lb 5711000194
Northwest Growers Select Shoestring Carrots 20lb 4635800027
Northwest Growers Select White Supersweet Cut Corn 30lb 5711000182
Northwest Growers Select 5.5″ Supersweet Cob Corn 48 count 528628
Organic by Nature
Organic by Nature Organic Baby Peas 16oz 4635800069
Organic by Nature Organic Butternut Squash 16oz 4635800075
Organic by Nature Organic California Broccoli Florets 16oz 4635800060
Organic by Nature Organic Chopped Kale 40lb R02208
Organic by Nature Organic Diced Carrots 50lb 20191
Organic by Nature Organic Diced Leeks 40lb R01810
Organic by Nature Organic Diced Onions 45lb AK#200064
Organic by Nature Organic Diced Onions 45lb 202819
Organic by Nature Organic Edamame 8oz 4635800073
Organic by Nature Organic Green Peas 50lb R01790
Organic by Nature Organic Multi-Colored Cauliflower Florets 16oz 4635800076
Organic by Nature Organic Petite Whole Green Beans 16oz 4635800071
Organic by Nature Organic Petite Whole Green Beans 5lb 4635800059
Organic by Nature Organic Root Medley 16oz 4635800074
Organic by Nature Organic Sweet Baby Peas 5lb 4635800063
Organic by Nature Organic Super Sweet White Corn 16oz 4635800070
Organic by Nature Organic Super Sweet Whole Kernel Corn 50lb R03881
Organic by Nature Organic Vegetable Medley 5lb 4635800066
Organic by Nature Organic Vegetable Medley with Shelled Edamame 5lb 4635800065
Organic by Nature Org White Corn 4lb 4635800070
Organic by Nature Organic White Corn 5lb 4635800064
Organic by Nature Organic Whole Kernel Sweet Corn 4lb 4635800058
Canadian-Costco Wholesale
Organic by Nature
Organic by Nature Organic Butternut Squash 2kg 4635800067
Organic by Nature Organic Sweet Peas 2.5kg 4635800061
Organic by Nature Organic Vegetable Medley 2.5kg 4635800062

 

Private Labels with CRF Identified through an unique number on bag Instructions to consumer> look for the highlighted numbers as shown Below Best By will include the following dates 04.26.16 thru 04.26.18
All Codes are found on the Back of the Bag in the following location down the back seam

Brand Container Size UPC Best by Date or Code on Retail Package
C.H. Belt’s
C.H. Belt’s Worlds Finest Cut Beans 20lb 00882240000695 202050001168 08:29
Chef Maxwell
Chef Maxwell California Blend 20lb 063027 Best By: 071616 352000009920 17:28
Chef Maxwell Cut Corn 20lb 051849 Best By: 071616 102000009920 17:29
Chef Maxwell Green Beans 20lb 051849 Best By: 071616 203050009920 17:30
Chef Maxwell Peas 20lb 051849 Best By: 071616 152000009920 17:31
Chef Maxwell Green Beans 25lb 1-bean-grf Best By: 071616 202530009920 17:32
Chef Maxwell Cut Corn 30lb 3530295002 Best By: 071616 10300000992017:33
Chef Maxwell Green Beans 30lb 3530295001 Best By: 071616 203050009920 17:34
Chef Maxwell Green Beans 30lb 63530295001 Best By: 071616 203050009920 17:35
Chef Maxwell Green Italian Beans 30lb 3530295001 Best By: 071616 203008009920 17:36
Chef Maxwell Green Peas 30lb 3530295003 Best By: 071616 153000009920 17:37
Chef Maxwell Peas & Carrots 30lb 98020 Best By: 071616 303000009920 17:38
Chef Maxwell Raw Mixed Vegetables 30lb 63530295005 Best By: 071616 403000009920 17:39
Chef Maxwell Carrots 30lb 635302-5004 Best By: 071616 254000009920 17:40
Correct Choice
Correct Choice CutCorn 30lb 30CBE 103000407766 08:26
Correct Choice Green Beans 30lb 30GBBE 203050007766 08:27
Correct Choice Green Beans 30lb 30GBCMI 203050007766 08:28
Correct Choice Green Peas 30lb 30PBE 153000007766 08:29
Earth’s Pride
Earth’s Pride Organics Chopped Spinach 5lb 0000027771 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 726623001122
Earth’s Pride Organics Peas 5lb 0000027772 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 556700001122
Earth’s Pride Organics Roasted Red Potatoes and Vegetable Medley 12oz 00000229244 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 743829001122
Endico
Endico Cut Corn 20lb 601459277304 102000007709 08:29
Endico Cut Green Beans 20lb 712 202050007709 08:30
Endico Peas 20lb 7720 152000007709 08:31
Endico Peas and Carrots 20lb 7730 302000007709 08:32
Farmer’s Bounty
Farmer’s Bounty Cut Corn 20lb 02300 102000407721 08:26
Farmer’s Bounty Corn 30lb 5711000171 103000407721 08:30
Farmer’s Bounty Diced Carrots 50lb 4635800029 255020004421 08:37
Farmer’s Bounty Cut Green Beans 20lb 07300 202050007721 08:27
Farmers Bounty Cut Green Beans 30lb 4635800007 203050007721 08:31
Farmers Bounty Green Peas 30lb 5711000161 152000007721 08:32
Farmer’s Bounty Green Peas 50lb 4635800028 155000007721 08:38
Farmer’s Bounty Mixed Vegetables 20lb 02300 402000007721 08:29
Farmer’s Bounty Mixed Vegetables 30lb 4635800003 403000007721 08:33
Farmer’s Bounty
Farmer’s Bounty Peas & Carrots 30lb 4635800002 303000007721 08:34
Farmer’s Bounty Raw Chopped Onions 45lb 26290 284523007721 08:36
Farmer’s Bounty Slice Carrots 30lb 463580008 4635800008 08:37
Farmer’s Bounty Whole Green Beans 15lb 4635800021 4635800021 08:38
Fiesta Mart
Fiesta Mart Cut Corn 16oz 5102280003 Best By: 122215 101200201178 15:23) Product of USA A
Fiesta Mart Green Peas 16oz 5102280005 Best By: 122215 151200001178 15:23) Product of USA A
Fiesta Mart Mixed Vegetables 16oz 5102280006 Best By: 122215 451200001178 15:23) Product of USA A
Fiesta Mart Peas & Carrots 16oz 5102280007 Best By: 122215 301200001178 15:23) Product of USA A
The Inn
The Inn Cut Corn 20lb 8628920723 102000401115 08:29
The Inn Cut Green Beans 20lb 8628920109 202050001115 08:30
The Inn Green Peas 20lb 8628920742 15200000111508:31
The Inn Diced Carrots 20lb 8628920742 252020001115 08:32
The Inn 4-Way Mixed Vegetables 20lb 8628920720 402000001115 08:33
The Inn 5-Way Mixed Vegetables 20lb 8628920744 45200000111508:34
The Inn Peas & Carrots 20lb 8628920749 302000001115 08:35
Live Smart
Live Smart Organic Bi- color Corn 16oz 604338 Product of USA 2B6101 02:11 B
Live Smart Green Peas 40oz 603546 Product of USA 2B6101 02:11 B
Live Smart Edamame 6oz 604369 Product of USA 2B6101 02:11 B
Live Smart Mini Bow Tie Pasta and Vegetable Blend 32oz 603232 Product of USA 2B6101 02:11 B
Live Smart Super Sweet Cut Corn 40oz 603379 Product of USA 2B6101 02:11 B
Live Smart Organic Vegetable Medley 16oz 604345 Product of USA 2B6101 02:11 B
Parade
Parade Baby Lima Beans 16oz 5070030670 Best By: 122215 311200001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Chopped Onions 12oz 5070055791 Best By: 122215 281123001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Crinkle Cut Carrots 16oz 5070030668 Best By: 122215 251235001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Cut Corn 16oz 5070030666 Best By: 122215 10120020110815:23) Product of USA A
Parade Cut Corn 32oz 5070007676 Best By: 122215 101500201108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Cut Green Beans 16oz 5070028672 Best By: 122215 201250001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Cut Green Beans 32oz 5070055810 Best By: 122215 20155000110815:23) Product of USA A
Parade Green Peas 16oz 5070031666 Best By: 122215 151200001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Green Peas 32oz 5070007682 Best By: 122215 151500001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Mixed Vegetables 16oz 5070030675 Best By: 122215 45150000110815:23) Product of USA A
Parade Mixed Vegetables 32oz 5070055832 Best By: 122215 451200001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Peas and Dice Carrots 16oz 5070031831 Best By: 122215 3011200001108 15:23) Product of USA A
Parade Petite Green Peas 16oz 5070055804 Best By: 122215 151210001108 15:23) Product of USA A
O Organic
O Organic Brussels Sprouts 10oz 7989340283 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Butternut Squash 10oz 7989340281 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Chopped Kale 10oz 7989340282 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Edamame 16oz 7989340179 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Garden Blend Vegetables 16oz 7989310100 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Green Peas 16oz 7989340174 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Golden Cut Corn 16oz 7989340175 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic
O Organic Mixed Vegetable Blend 16oz 7989340182 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organics Org 4way 16oz 7989340182 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organics Org SS Corn 16oz 7989340175 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Sliced Peaches 10oz 7989340650 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Wild Blueberries 10oz 7989340654 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Wild Strawberries 48oz 7989340275 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Whole Green Beans 16oz 7989340180 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
O Organic Whole Strawberries 10oz 7989340652 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Panda Express
Panda Express Carrots & Peas 20lb 10882210001309 Use By: 021415 BF 16:20
Panda Express Super Sweet Corn 20lb 07913 Use By: 021415 BF 16:20
Pantry Essentials
Pantry Essentials Cut Corn 64oz 2113015225 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Pantry Essentials Cut Green Beans 12oz 2113015221 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Pantry Essentials Cut Green Beans 32oz 2113015155 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Pantry Essentials Green Peas 64oz 2113015226 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Pantry Essentials Vegetable Blend 32oz 2113015151 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Pantry Essentials Vegetable Blend 64oz 2113015227 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens
Safeway Kitchens Crinkle Cut Carrots 24oz 2113009109 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Cut Green Beans 16oz 2113009151 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Cut Green Beans 32oz 2113009083 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens
Safeway Kitchens Green Peas 32oz 2113009029 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Green Peas & Diced Carrots 12oz 2113009182 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Mixed Vegetables 16oz 2113009153 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Mixed Vegetables 32oz 2113009042 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Red, Green and Yellow Pepper Strips 14oz 2113009100 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Super Sweet Corn 12oz 2113009065 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Safeway Kitchens Whole Petite Green Beans 12oz 2113009005 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens
Signature Kitchens Asparagus, Corn & Carrots Blend 12oz 2113009181 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Chopped Onion 12oz 2113009049 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Cut Green Beans 16oz 2113009151 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens French Cut Green Beans 16oz 2113009082 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Cut Green Beans 32oz 2113009083 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Crinkle Cut Carrots 16oz 2113009945 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Crinkle Cut Carrots 24oz 2113009945 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Edamame 48oz 2113009197 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Green Peas 16oz 2113009028 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Green Peas 32oz 2113009029 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Green Peas (NO SALT ADDED) 16oz 2113009031 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens
Signature Kitchens Harvest Vegetable Blend 12oz 2113024259 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Lima Beans 16oz 2113009946 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Lima Beans 20oz 2113009946 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Mixed Vegetables (4- way) 16oz 2113009153 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Mixed Vegetables (4- way) 32oz 2113009042 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Mixed Vegetables (5- way) 12oz 2113024258 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Mixed Vegetables (5- way) 32oz 2113009042 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Peas & Carrots 12oz 2113009182 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Peas & Carrots 16oz 2113009154 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Peas & Carrots 32oz 2113009033 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Petite Green Peas 12oz 2113009030 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Petite Green Peas 16oz 2113024252 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Pepper Strips 14oz 2113009100 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Shelled Edamame 16oz 2113009092 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Stew Vegetables 16oz 2113009947 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Stir Fry Vegetable 16oz 2113009077 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Stir Fry Vegetable 32oz 2113009186 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Sugar Snap Peas 12oz 2113024260 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Sweet Corn 12oz 2113009065 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens
Signature Kitchens White Sweet Corn 12oz 2113009035 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens White Sweet Corn 16oz 2113024254 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Whole Kernel Corn 16oz 2113009152 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Whole Kernel Corn 32oz 2113009021 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Whole Green Beans 16oz 2113024256 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Signature Kitchens Whole Green Beans 12oz 2113009005 Best Before: Oct 23 17S3904 15:08 B Product of USA
Trader Joe’s
Trader Joe’s Organic Broccoli Florettes 16oz 00542784 Lot 115 16 BF 22:58 C Product of USA
Trader Joe’s Organic Foursome 16oz 00959902 Lot 115 16 BF 22:58 C Product of USA
Trader Joe’s Organic Peas 16oz 00496636 Lot 115 16 BF 22:58 C Product of USA
Trader Joe’s Petite Peas 16oz 00122689 Lot 115 16 BF 22:58 C Product of USA
Trader Joe’s Organic Super Sweet Cut Corn 16oz 00299633 Lot 115 16 BF 22:58 C Product of USA
Trader Joe’s Organic Whole Green Beans 16oz 00169219 Lot 115 16 BF 22:58 C Product of USA
USDA
USDA Cut Corn 30lb 103000404407 103000404407 08:26
USDA Cut Green Beans 30lb 203050004407 203050004407 08:27
USDA Green Peas 30lb 153000004407 153000004407 08:28
USDA Super Sweet Corn 30lb 103000404407 103000204407 08:29
VIP
VIP Baby Lima Beans 16oz 7007701016 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Cut Green Beans 32oz 7007701208 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Green Peas 16oz 7007701064 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Green Peas 32oz 7007701264 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Mixed Vegetables 16oz 7007701076 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP
VIP Mixed Vegetables 32oz 7007701276 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Peas & Carrots 16oz 7007701068 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Super Sweet Cut Corn 16oz 7007701048 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Super Sweet Cut Corn 32oz 7007701248 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Supreme Bean & Carrot Blend 14oz 7007705002 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Supreme Fiesta Blend 14oz 7007705009 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Supreme Garden Stir-Fry 14oz 7007705010 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Supreme Healthy Garden Blend 14oz 7007705011 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
VIP Supreme Stir-Fry Sensation 14oz 7007705027 3756 107 16 08:27 A USA/CANADA
Wellsley Farms
Wellsley Farms Organic Chopped Spinach 4lb 8867001013 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 746700001137
Wellsley Farms Organic Mixed Vegetables 4lb 8867000997 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 556700001137
Wellsley Farms Organic Peas 12oz 8867000998 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 888670009987
Wellsley Farms Organic Roasted Red Potato & Vegetable Medley 4lb 8867001014 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 176700401137
Wellsley Farms Organic Sweet Corn 5lb 8867000999 Best By: 041218 103 16 23:01 B Product of USA 726623981137
Private Labels with CRF Identified through an unique number on bag
Instructions to consumer> look for the highlighted numbers as shown Below Best By will include the following dates 04.26.16 thru 04.26.18
All Codes are found on the Back of the Bag in the following location down the back seam
JFDA Kernel Corns 1kg 991438945338 Use By: 20160924 10190040113116:20 Product of USA B
JFDA Mix Vegetables 1kg 991438945321 Use By: 20160924 351900007731 16:20 Product of USA A
McCain
McCain Green Peas 1kg 991438945116 Use By: 20160924 151900004489 16:20 Product of USA A
McCain Cut Corn 500g 99143894523 Use By: 20160924 103400401189 16:20 Product of USA B
McCain Kernel Corn 1kg 991438945130 Use By: 20160924 101900401189 16:20 Product of USA A
McCain Mixed Vegetables 500g 99143894522 Use By: 20160924 353400001189 16:20 Product of USA B
McCain Mixed Vegetables 1kg 991438945123 Use By: 20160924 351900007789 16:20 Product of USA A
McCain Super Sweet Kernel Corn 1kg 991438945017 Use By: 20160924 101900201189 16:20 Product of USA B
McCain (NZ)
McCain Peas (NZ) 500g 310174006014 10012017 04:56 153700001152 A
McCain Peas (NZ) 1kg 310174006021 10012017 04:56 151900001152 A
McCain YGC
McCain YGC Green Peas 1kg 991438945376 Use By: 20160924 151900004432 16:20 Product of USA A
McCain YGC Mixed Vegetables 1kg 991438945383 Use By: 20160924 351900007732 16:20 Product of USA A
McCain YGC Super Sweet Kernel Corn 1kg 991438945369 Use By: 20160924 10190020113216:20 Product of USA A
Mity Fresh
Mity Fresh Sweet Corn 1kg 7437331054 P: 01/2015 E: 06/2014 107000404428 01:20 A
Mountain Mist
Mountain Mist Cut Corn 1kg 4635800056 Use By: 20150512 101900404438 16:20 Product of USA D
Mountain Mist Green Peas 1kg 4635800057 Use By: 20150512 151900007738 16:20 Product of USA D
Mountain Mist Super Sweet Corn 1kg 4635800056 Use By: 20150512 101900204438 16:20 Product of USA D
Mountain Mist Mixed Vegetables 1kg 4635800055 Use By: 20150512 351900007738 16:20 Product of USA D
Overhill Farms
Overhill Farms 1-1/2″ Cut Green Beans 30lb 0931140 203017001168 08:29
Veggie Maria
Veggie Maria Onion Cut 500g 543567006321 2016/01 20:55 B 103700201142
Veggie Maria Super Sweet Corn 500g 543567006314 2016/01 20:55 B 283720001142
Life Foods
Life Foods Green Peas 1kg 903392007694 Use By: 20160924 151900007716 16:20 Product of USA A
Life Foods Kernel Corn 1kg 903392007670 Use By: 20160924 101900404416 16:20 Product of USA A
Life Foods Kernel Super Sweet Corn 1kg 903392001579 Use By: 20160924 101900201116 16:20 Product of USA A
Life Foods Mixed Vegetables 1kg 903392007687 Use By: 20160924 351900007716 16:20 Product of USA A

 

Private Labels with CRF Identified through an unique number on bag
Instructions to consumer> look for the code with one of the letters at the end A, B, C,D Best By will include the following dates 04.26.16 thru 04.26.18
All Codes are found on the Back of the Bag in the following location down the back seam, lower right hand corner

Brand Container Size UPC What to look for Code Examples
Emerald Farms
Emerald Farms Cut Corn 40oz 3765403671 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
Emerald Farms Green Peas 40oz 3765403672 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA D
Emerald Farms Peas and Carrots 40oz 3765403673 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA C
Emerald Farms Mixed Vegetable 40oz 3765403670 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA E
Endico
Endico Cut Corn 40oz 0145916420 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
Endico Green Peas 40oz 0145916720 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA B
Endico Mixed Vegetables 40oz 0145916610 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA C
Endico Peas and Carrots 40oz 0145916730 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA D
Great Value
Great Value Cut Green Beans 12oz 7874205333 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 A 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Mixed Vegetables 12oz 7874205334 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 B 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Peas & Carrots 12oz 7874205335 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 C 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Sweet Peas 12oz 7874205336 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 A 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Sweet Peas 26oz 7874210912 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 B 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Mixed Vegetables 26oz 7874210907 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 C 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Whole Kernel Golden Corn 12oz 7874205338 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 A 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Whole Kernel Golden Corn 26oz 7874210910 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 B 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value
Great Value Steamable Cut Green Beans 12oz 7874208363 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 C 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Steamable Mixed Vegetables 12oz 7874208026 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 A 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Steamable Sweet Corn 12oz 7874208024 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 B 23:02 Product of USA
Great Value Steamable Sweet Peas 12oz 7874208369 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 C 23:02 Product of USA
James Farm
James Farm Cut Corn 32oz 6069501044 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
James Farm Cut Green Beans 32oz 6069501004 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA B
James Farm Garden Peas 32oz 6069501000 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA C
James Farm Mixed Vegetables 32oz 6069501542 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA D
James Farm Peas & Carrots 40oz 6069501001 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA E
James Farm Whole Green Beans 32oz 6069501003 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
Kirkland Signature
Kirkland Signature Organic Stir-Fry 4lb 9661910114 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 B USA/Holland/Ecuador Certified Organic By WSDA
Price First
Price First Corn 16oz 7874211030 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 A 23:02 Product of USA
Price First Sweet Green Peas 16oz 7874211027 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best If Used By: 042318 E 23:02 Product of USA
Quirch
Quirch Baby Lima Beans 14oz 6507260150 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
Quirch Baby Lima Beans 32oz 6507260149 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA B
Quirch Corn 14oz 6507260136 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA C
Quirch Corn 32oz 6507260135 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA D
Quirch Mixed Vegetables 14oz 6507260130 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA E
Quirch Mixed Vegetables 32oz 6507260129 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
Quirch Peas & Carrots 16oz 6507260152 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA A
Quirch Peas & Carrots 32oz 6507260151 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA B
Quirch Sweet Peas 14oz 6507260140 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA C
Quirch Sweet Peas 32oz 6507260139 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA D
Season’s Choice
Season’s Choice Garden Fresh Sweet Peas 16oz 4149816429 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best Before: 032518 A 15:15 Product of USA
Season’s Choice Seamed Mixed Vegetables 12oz 4149820284 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best Before: 032518 B 15:15 Product of USA
Season’s Choice Super Sweet Whole Kernel Corn 16oz 4149816428 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best Before: 032518 A 15:15 Product of USA
Simply Nature
Simply Nature Organic Mixed Vegetables 16oz 4149829655 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA D
Simply Nature Organic Sweet Corn 16oz 4149829656 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Sell By: 012515 15:15 Product of USA E
True Goodness
True Goodness Organic Broccoli Florets 10oz 1373343097 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic Chopped Spinach 10oz 1373343101 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic Cut Green Beans 10oz 1373343095 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic Mixed Vegetables 10oz 1373343096 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic Peas 10oz 1373343100 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic Peas & Shoestring Carrots 10oz 1373343104 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic Petite Green Peas 10oz 1373343099 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
True Goodness Organic White Sweet Corn 10oz 1373343098 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA
Wild Oats
Wild Oats Organic Broccoli Florets 10oz 4873700377 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 A Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Broccoli & Cauliflower 10oz 4873700711 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 B Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Chopped Kale 10oz 4873700379 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 C Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Chopped Spinach 10oz 4873700380 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 D Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Cut Green Beans 12oz 4873700713 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 A Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Diced Butternut Squash 10oz 4873700710 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 B Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Diced Sweet Potatoes 10oz 4873700709 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 C Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Mixed Vegetables 12oz 4873700715 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 D Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Sweet Corn 12oz 4873700714 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 A Product of USA
Wild Oats Organic Sweet Peas 12oz 4873700712 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 040918 15:15 B Product of USA
Export
Woolworths Homebrand Frozen Peas 1kg 300633968458 Look for one of these letters (A,B,C,D, E) Best By: 042318 16:30 D Product of USA

Original Press Release

###

Page Last Updated: 05/03/2016

 

 

 

Sourced through Scoop.it from: www.fda.gov

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See on Scoop.itreNourishment

Five Steps to Stress-Free, Healthy Family Meals

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Regular meals serve as an easily measured proxy for one of longest-standing and sturdiest determinants of adolescent well-being: authoritative parenting.

Year after year, studies show the family meal as being an important factor in raising children successfully. It doesn’t even have to be an evening meal—busy families may find that breakfast is a better option. Why does this work?

The very act of putting a meal together for everyone shows caring (warmth) and planning (or structure) on the part of the parents, and expecting the children (especially adolescents and teens) to be there shows structure.

Why are warmth and structure important?

The New York Times blog post “Where’s the Magic in Family Dinner?” has an interesting take on this: “In the early 1970s, the psychologist Diana Baumrind identified two essential components of parenting: structure and warmth. Authoritative parents bring both. They hold high standards for behavior while being lovingly engaged with their children. Decades of research have documented that teenagers raised by authoritative parents are the ones most likely to do well at school, enjoy abundant psychological health and stay out of trouble. In contrast, adolescents with authoritarian parents (high on structure, low on warmth), indulgent parents (low on structure, high on warmth) or neglectful parents (low on both) don’t fare nearly so well.”(Sourced through Scoop.it from: well.blogs.nytimes.com See on Scoop.itreNourishment)

Clearly, when the meal is home-cooked with care, the benefits of family meals include improved mental, emotional, and physical health. But how to implement this in a world full of compelling forces pulling families in different directions?

I’ve certainly been there—in fact, I researched and wrote an article for Vision.org on this topic, and have posted it below (with permission). I have heard from people that found it helpful, and hope it helps you and your family as well.

Five Steps to Stress-Free, Healthy Family Meals

Multiple studies have shown there are physical as well as mental benefits when meals are shared in a peaceful setting. Teens are known to have fewer troubles in life and better relationships with parents when they habitually eat five or more meals per week with the family. Regular peaceful, healthy meals encourage better digestion and reduce the likelihood of abdominal obesity, which in turn helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular and other chronic diseases.

The long-term value of this habit is undeniable. Nevertheless, to those for whom it is a new concept, it may seem easier said than done. Determining to make this healthy lifestyle change is probably the hardest part—beyond that, it helps to have a plan.

First, make sure your shopping includes healthful purchases and does not include high-fat, high-sodium and high-sugar processed foods. Instead, stock the refrigerator, the freezer and the pantry with quick-cooking meats and a variety of vegetables. Think thin: pounded chicken breasts or fish fillets with sliced vegetables cook quickly in a skillet, under a broiler or on a grill while a pot of quinoa, millet, brown rice, or whole grain pasta or couscous is cooking. Or, if you’re fond of your slow-cooker, put raw items in at the beginning of the day and return hours later to a steaming, fully cooked meal.

If your taste is for cold foods, get creative with salads. Start with a bed of greens; add bite-sized morsels of fruit or vegetables; layer chunks of cheese, hard-cooked eggs, slices of leftover roast beef or chicken, a handful of nuts, or a can of tuna or beans for protein; and top with a splash of citrus juice, or vinegar and olive oil, and a sprinkling of herbs. In little time you will have a quick, delicious and satisfying repast.

Second, relax. If you are not alone, solicit help with the preparation. A stressed cook can easily make everyone else feel stressed. Getting others—yes, even the children—involved in the preparation can help turn a potential chore into a social event. Enjoy the process. Savor the colors and scents of different foods as you experiment. Tasks that can be shared include making a salad, chopping vegetables, grilling meat or vegetables, cleaning and putting things away as you finish with them, and setting the table.

Third, set an attractive table. Plates and flatware carefully and thoughtfully arranged send a message of order and tranquility. Add colorful napkins and a centerpiece—perhaps some flowers in a vase or a basket of attractive fruit or vegetables. Avoiding visual clutter by not putting condiments and beverages on the table in their commercial packaging may take a few more seconds but adds to the serenity. Candles are another sure way to add to the calm atmosphere. For some, the lighting of a candle before mealtime becomes an important ritual.

Fourth, turn off electronic distractions. Blaring televisions and radios only add to stress levels. Cell phones, text messaging and audible e-mail alerts cause unpleasant interruptions and will not add to a relaxing atmosphere. Soft background music, however, may be a welcome addition. Some families find it helpful to compile CDs of family members’ favorite relaxing tunes for such occasions.

Fifth, remember that good manners (thinking of others and their needs) and proper etiquette (rules governing socially acceptable behavior) are essential to a tranquil ambience. Teaching and reinforcing good habits while dining is natural for parents, and necessary, but be careful to do so with a positive approach. Mealtime is not the time to be harshly correcting children, chiding spouses or complaining about coworkers. Avoid contention while dining. Instead, concentrate on complimenting others at the table and discussing positive aspects of the day’s events.

When the meal is over, enlist help with cleanup. Sometimes those who benefited from the meal need to be reminded that it didn’t just appear spontaneously and that thorough cleanup is part of the whole process. This task is not necessarily as daunting if others pitch in, and the benefits may be surprising. Many budding conversationalists, immobilized by hands in sudsy water, have found themselves having meaningful interactions in front of the kitchen sink.

Study after study has proven there are multiple lasting benefits for adults and children alike when meals are shared. Breakfast, weekend brunch, lunch, or dinner—they all matter! Whether you live alone or with a large family, turning mealtimes into an oasis of calm in the midst of a chaotic day will make a difference in your health, your relationships and your life.

 

ALICE ABLER

Until next time~

Cupid’s Real Psyche

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Do you ever wonder where the traditions we’re so familiar with today actually come from? The origins of what we do—the why?

Screen Shot 2016-02-13 at 10.47.21 AM

Take Valentine’s Day, for example. Oh, sure . . . we’ve all heard tales of a martyred St. Valentine, imprisoned for performing weddings for inmate soldiers and persecuted Christians who were forbidden to marry, along with other Internet variations on this theme. But what about Cupid? How did he get to be such a big part of the celebration?

To dig down and find the real stories and the original sources takes a bit of doing. I had the opportunity to do just this a while ago, researching and writing an in-depth article on this topic for Vision.org. What I found was fascinating.

The surprising truth is not what most people expect. It may take some time to wrap your brain around this, so pour yourself a lovely cup of tea and read on for the facts about where Cupid really came from.

(The following, originally published in the Winter 2010 issue of Vision, is reprinted with permission.)

Cupid’s Disheartening Past

Ah, Cupid, that cherubic being who represents love and lovers everywhere. Unofficial celebrity ambassador for Valentine’s Day. Winged bearer of bow and arrows that prick the hearts of the unsuspecting and make them fall in love.

Despite his perpetually youthful appearance, Cupid is no neophyte. History shows that this veteran Valentine has been plying his trade since ancient times. Myth and legend grew over the millennia, providing him with many names and roles since his first appearance in the cradle of civilization.

Although in modern times he materializes as a putto, or winged baby, earlier art shows him as a somewhat older winged child. And in the famous tale of Cupid and Psyche (from Lucius Apuleius’s second-century Metamorphoses, or The Golden Ass) he was a fully grown yet youthful adult—the son of a jealous mother and the husband of the most beautiful mortal in the world.

But don’t let his look of youthful innocence fool you. Behind that bright, angelic face hides a rather darker past.
ROMANTIC ROOTS

In Roman mythology, Cupid’s mother was Venus, the goddess of love and beauty. Venus and Cupid (from the Latin cupido, meaning “desire” or “lust”) were associated with Lupercalia, the pagan mid-February festival of purification and fertility that foreshadowed the modern Valentine’s Day. As part of the festivities, Luperci—nearly naked young boys smeared with the blood of sacrificed dogs and goats—ran through the streets, flailing women with whiplike thongs (februa) cut from the skin of the ill-fated goats. The piercing of the women’s skin was believed to induce fertility. In a similar vein, it was believed that Cupid could cause love or sexual desire by piercing his victims with gold-tipped arrows.

Tales of Cupid and his mother are intertwined throughout history, so it is impossible to do justice to a history of one without the other. The story of Cupid is therefore necessarily also the story of his mother. Each has a counterpart in Hellenistic Greek mythology, where Aphrodite is the goddess of love and beauty, and her son, the youngest god in the pantheon, is Eros.

Venus and Aphrodite are generally thought of as the same goddess in different guises. They share the symbols of white doves and red roses and are usually portrayed as the Queen of Heaven, with an aureole or nimbus—a halo—and a crescent moon. They often appear with an infant son—an early Madonna figure (see “Cultic Convergence”).

As for Eros, one of the earliest recorded references is found in theTheogeny of Hesiod (700 B.C.E.). Hesiod depicts Eros as one of the primeval gods, the god of fertility and sensual love, and responsible for the creation of all living things. This Eros is a much more powerful being than the one who appears later as the son of Aphrodite/Venus—the cutesy Cupid of modern Valentine’s Day cards.

But Cupid existed in still earlier incarnations. Traveling back through antiquity, we find that his previous personas were also far from helpless babes with tiny wings.
ASCENT OF DUMUZI

When it comes to ancient pagan mythology, stories often intersect and overlap as the gods twist their way through cultures and through history as a whole. The story of Cupid and his mother is no exception. According to some ancient tales, Venus, goddess of love, was besotted with Adonis, who shares a number of commonalities with Cupid and Eros. Both Adonis and Eros worship were brought to Greece from the Near East. The name Adonis is a derivation of the Semitic word for “lord” and is believed to have come to the Greek language from a title of Dumuzi (or in Hebrew, Tammuz), one of the most famous gods of Mesopotamia and Sumeria.

Like Adonis, and later Eros and Cupid, Tammuz was a youthful god and was associated with a female deity whose symbols included white doves, red roses, a crescent moon and a sun-disc or nimbus. This Mother Goddess is known by the names Ishtar (Astarte) and Inanna, as recorded in the Sumerian Inanna’s Descent to the Nether World and the parallel Akkadian Descent of Ishtar, and she is sometimes portrayed holding a male infant.

But her infant son, Tammuz, was also her brother and/or consort. (Such a confused, incestuous relationship was not unusual among the ancient mythological deities.) Extant liturgies and poems to the two are often explicit and overtly sexual in nature.

The late Assyriologist Stephen H. Langdon included a translation of a telling liturgy to Tammuz in his 1914 book, Tammuz and Ishtar: A Monograph Upon Babylonian Religion and Theology, to illustrate the relationship between the two:

“O brother fruit of my eyes, lifting up of my eyes,
Who is thy sister? I am thy sister.
Who is thy mother? I am thy mother.
In the sunrise when thou risest, rise!
At the dawn when thou appearest, appear!”
“The queen of Eanna who cries, ‘Alas! my husband, alas! my son’.”

Eanna was the temple of Ishtar in the city of Erech; so according to this religious text, the Queen of Eanna was Ishtar, and her brother/son/husband was Tammuz.

THE SON ALSO RISES

In some tales, Tammuz is killed by a wild boar (not unlike Adonis in later myth). In Inanna’s [Ishtar’s] Descent, Tammuz is forced to descend into the underworld. While he is away, vegetation dies and procreation on earth ceases. Ishtar, torn with grief, agrees to take his place in the underworld for half of each year, temporarily releasing him to the land above. When Tammuz makes his annual return to earth, fertility is restored and life begins anew.

The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary describes the tale’s meaning for Sumerians: “The relationship between Inanna-Ishtar and Dumuzi-Tammuz was ritualized in Mesopotamian cult with the sacred marriage: the mating of the king with a sacred temple prostitute renewed the generative forces in nature. The seasonal cycle was seen as a mirror of Dumuzi’s yearly descent into and ascent from the underworld, a religious element that wends its way even to the temple courtyard in Jerusalem (see Ezek 8:14).”

After a time of mourning, or “weeping for Tammuz,” and bowing to the rising sun in the east (a practice lamented by the prophet Ezekiel in Ezekiel 8:14–16), devotees celebrated the resurrection of the sun god—the youthful shepherd-god of vegetation and fertility—with cakes for the Queen of Heaven, eggs, and the sacrifice and consumption of a goat or a pig, as well as with fertility rituals assuring the restoration of procreation and the renewal of all living things.

Ancient fertility ceremonies, vegetation rites and sun worship were common in many cultures, as Sumerians, Mesopotamians, Babylonians and others all believed that the rising sun was connected to rebirth and renewal. In the symbolism of the ancients, arrows were a male symbol associated with both sun gods and fertility gods. The familiar stylized heart, on the other hand, is often viewed as a female symbol (having nothing to do with an actual physiological heart) and is thus also closely linked with fertility. Although traditions and theories on the origins of various symbols vary, it is no accident that hearts and arrows have come down through the ages inextricably tied to the eternally youthful fertility god we know as Cupid today.
DEATH—AND REBIRTH—ON THE NILE

But the history of Cupid extends even beyond Tammuz. In his 1915 book, Myths of Babylonia and Assyria, Donald A. Mackenzie explained: “Among the gods of Babylonia none achieved wider and more enduring fame than Tammuz, who was loved by Ishtar, the amorous Queen of Heaven—the beautiful youth who died and was mourned for and came to life again.” He noted further, “The Babylonian myth of Tammuz, the dying god, bears a close resemblance to the Greek myth of Adonis. It also links with the myth of Osiris.”

Osiris is an Egyptian counterpart to Tammuz. Both, like Cupid, are youthful gods of fertility. Both are associated with death and rebirth, with a powerful mother/sister/consort goddess, and with many of the same symbols.

Ishtar, Venus and Aphrodite have their Egyptian parallel in the goddess Isis. Apuleius, a devotee of Isis, addressed her nature and her various names in Metamorphoses. This tale of a man-turned-beast chronicles his quest to return to his human form, which is finally accomplished through prayer to Isis—whom he addresses as “Blessed Queen of Heaven”—and through his consuming a garland of her sacred roses (“rosary”).

Isis responds: “I am Nature, the universal Mother, mistress of all the elements, primordial child of time, sovereign of all things spiritual, queen of the dead, queen also of the immortals, the single manifestation of all gods and goddesses that are. . . . Though I am worshipped in many aspects, known by countless names, and propitiated with all manner of different rites, yet the whole round earth venerates me.

“The primeval Phrygians call me Pessinuntica, Mother of the gods; the Athenians, sprung from their own soil, call me Cecropian Artemis; for the islanders of Cyprus I am Paphian Aphrodite; for the archers of Crete I am Dictynna; for the trilingual Sicilians, Stygian Proserpine; and for the Eleusinians their ancient Mother of the Corn.

“Some know me as Juno, some as Bellona of the Battles; others as Hecate, others again as Rhamnubia, but both races of Ethiopians, whose lands the morning sun first shines upon, and the Egyptians who excel in ancient learning and worship me with ceremonies proper to my godhead, call me by my true name, namely, Queen Isis.”
ORIGIN OF THE DIVINITIES

With different names in different locations at different times, it is not surprising that variations of each god and goddess myth abound. Some historians maintain that such myths have origins in human history, but that the tales enlarge and expand with time. As an example, in some tales Cupid’s arrows were made by his father Vulcan, the god of fire. The name Vulcan is thought to come from Bel-Cain or Tubal-cain, “an instructor of every craftsman in bronze and iron” (Genesis 4:22) and a descendant of Cain.

In like manner, the humans Nimrod and Semiramis have been connected with Isis and Osiris, Ishtar and Tammuz, and other parallel deities. Tradition holds that Nimrod, a great-grandson of Noah, married Semiramis, the ambitious wife of a general in Nimrod’s Babylonian army.

Semiramis and Nimrod (sometimes called Ninus) grew in power and corruption. The book of Genesis says Nimrod became the first man of such power, a mighty hunter who built cities. It is said that he also built walls to keep out wild animals and thus protect the inhabitants. Though he gained a great following, Genesis speaks of his rebellion against God, and most believe he was the force behind the building of the Tower of Babel. Nimrod was eventually killed, after which he came to be worshiped as the sun god Marduk (Bel or Baal).

Following Nimrod’s death, Semiramis carried on alone, establishing more cities, conquering new territories, and thus building her empire. Legends surrounding her grew to show that she, too, had divine roots. She had allegedly been fed by doves after being abandoned by her mother, a fish goddess; instead of dying, she assumed the form of a dove and flew to heaven.

When the widowed Semiramis became pregnant, she claimed that it was a divine conception; the baby, she declared, was Nimrod himself, reborn as a god to be worshiped. The child was called Tammuz.

Sir James G. Frazer, in his classic work The Golden Bough, compares the exploits of the legendary Semiramis to those of the goddess Ishtar: “It is not merely that the myth of Ishtar thus tallies with the legend of Semiramis. . . . We can hardly doubt that the mythical Semiramis is substantially a form of Ishtar or Astarte, the great Semitic goddess of love and fertility.”
MOTHER-CHILD CULTS

As with Ishtar and her various incarnations, doves play an important role in the legends surrounding Semiramis, and she, too, is known as the Queen of Heaven and Mother of the Gods. A spouse reborn, doves, crescent moon below and stars or nimbus above, the image of the mother and child—as we have seen, these icons reappear frequently throughout history.

The King James Version Study Bible notes that “much of the world’s idolatry can be traced back to historical Babylon (cf. Gen. 11:1–9), including the mother-child cult of Semiramis-Tammuz (cf. Jer. 44:16–19; Ezek. 8:9, 14), which entered other cultures as Ashtaroth-Baal, Aphrodite-Eros, Venus-Cupid, and even Madonna-Child.”

During Cupid’s transformation in myth and legend from the illegitimate son of a corrupt queen to a mischievous little love-inducing cherub, he has had many names and roles. Other Cupid cognates from around the world include Attis, Bacchus, Dionysius, Amor, Phanes, Protogonos, Liber and Kama. Through the ensuing millennia and across multiple cultures, the names and stories are conflated and confounded, culminating in the innocent-looking Cupid of today’s Valentine’s Day celebrations.

From a lusty shepherd-king who died annually, causing weeping of women throughout the known world, to the incestuous sun god who is the bringer of life, his tales span eons and outlive entire civilizations with variations in names and lore. This intertwined history of Cupid and his mother, the traditional mother/son/spouse deities of sexual love and desire, may be somewhat hidden today; thus few who pay homage to Cupid with contemporary Valentine rituals comprehend that they are continuing customs and traditions that have come down to us from ancient pagan worship rites. And although the character of the ancient Mother Goddess, the Queen of Heaven, may not be so obvious today, she and her symbols clearly played a key role in Cupid’s many incarnations throughout history.

ALICE ABLER
alice.abler@visionjournal.org

SELECTED REFERENCES:

1 Apuleius, Metamorphoses (Robert Graves translation, 1950). 2 James Stevens Curl, The Egyptian Revival: Ancient Egypt as the Inspiration for Design Motifs in the West (2005).  3 James G. Frazer, The Golden Bough(1890, 1911–15).  4 David Noel Freedman (editor-in-chief), The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (1996 electronic edition).  5 The King James Version Study Bible (1997 electronic edition).  6 Stephen H. Langdon, Tammuz and Ishtar: A Monograph Upon Babylonian Religion and Theology (1914).  7 David Adams Leeming, Jealous Gods and Chosen People: The Mythology of the Middle East (2004).  8 Donald A. Mackenzie, Myths of Babylonia and Assyria (1915, 2007).  9 Bruce M. Metzger, Michael D. Coogan and Ronald S. Hendel (editors), The Oxford Companion to the Bible (Oxford Biblical Studies Online, 2010).

~Until next time . . .

Join the Real Food Revolution!

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There’s a growing community of people who are concerned about our food, our health and the health of the next generation. Avoiding pesticides and other harmful chemicals in our foods, avoiding “food” that may be tasty and convenient but is killing us slowly, avoiding harmful processing that strips the nutrients from food, and treating the land and animals with the respect it all deserves all plays a big part in our health.

I recently had the opportunity to interview several professionals on this topic. This short video helps explain some of the importance of such a community, showcasing some personal journeys to health via Real Food (traditionally-prepared, nutrient-dense, minimally processed natural foods), with a focus on one person who has made enormous contributions in this field.

One of the champions of the Real Food movement, Elaina Luther, formed Pasadena’s Culture Club 101 in 2008. It is unique in its offerings of traditionally-prepared, health-promoting Real Food and ancestral cuisine, as well as being a community where people can purchase traditional foods, learn about healthful food preparation, and just talk with others about this topic and grow in understanding.

Elaina then went on to organize the Real Food Symposium series, which shares valuable information with the public on various topics like “The Skinny on Fat” (the importance of good fats in the diet), cheesemaking, raw milk, brewing, fermentation, the GAPS diet, organic gardening, beekeeping, and the importance of pasture-raised animal products.

She has a goal of reaching and helping even more people, opening a retail business and cafe with space for educational classes. This will be a resource for traditional, nutrient-dense Real Food:

a commercial kitchen for traditional Real Food preparation;

a store where you can find all your Real Food pantry essentials, supplies and equipment-advice and troubleshooting included;

a training, mentoring, and learning center;

a cafe and tasting room for pop-up dinners;

expanded product offerings and home deliveries.

And we’re so excited to see that construction has begun on the new facility!

But she needs some help. If you, like us, feel strongly about the importance of Real Food, please join us in helping this cause. You can join us and become part of the Real Food Revolution through the CC101  Go Fund Me Campaign that will help realize this goal.

If you are new to Real Foods and want to learn more about how food affects health, I would highly recommend the Real Food Symposium DVD sets. As each symposium helped me put the puzzle together, the knowledge on each DVD would also help you on your journey to optimal health.

Until next time~

P.S. One important question (and answer!) from CC101: I don’t live in Pasadena or even Southern California. Why should I donate to save Culture Club 101?

CC101 was much more than just a small private culinary club in Pasadena.  It was an important grassroots seed and model that was creating change in our much corrupted commercial food system from the ground up.  It taught its members what was possible in nutrient dense foods free from chemicals and additives that negatively impact health.  As it is one of many change agents around the country that are intent upon creating enough market demand to make changes to our commercial food system.  Already that impact is being felt by the increased demand for Non-GMO and organic foods.  By its very existence CC101 impacts this kind of change throughout the country.  It is a model that can be duplicated.  Interested folks can come here for mentoring and to experience what is possible.

 

US Clears Genetically Modified Salmon for Human Consumption

US health regulators on Thursday cleared the way for a type of genetically engineered Atlantic salmon to be farmed for human consumption—the first such approval for an animal whose DNA has been scientifically modified.

Are you ready for this? After decades of back-and-forth with US health regulators, it’s finally here. Oh, it sounds good on the surface: fish that grow twice as fast, thereby conserving resources and feeding the masses. But like so many other things we have done to our food supply, we have no idea of the long-term consequences.

Researchers wondered what would happen if a fish or two escaped and mated with wild trout, so they cross-bred them and studied the results. (These were published in the July 2013 Proceedings of the Royal Society.) The hybrid fish grew even faster than their GM parents and ate up the available food faster than their non-GM siblings.

The study authors warned, “These results provide empirical evidence of the first steps towards introgression of foreign transgenes into the genomes of new species and contribute to the growing evidence that transgenic animals have complex and context-specific interactions with wild populations. We suggest that interspecific hybridization be explicitly considered when assessing the environmental consequences should transgenic animals escape to nature.”

The good news? The hybrid fish seem to be sterile. Concerns about the environmental effects  resulted in the company only marketing sterile female GM salmon.

Although it will be a while before it’s actually available commercially, it’s important to note that with current labelling laws, the fish does not have to be labelled as GM. This means that consumers may not know when they are eating it.

How to avoid it? Look for wild-caught salmon (and other fish).

More on this subject (from Reuters) below:

AquaBounty says its salmon can grow to market size in half the time of conventional salmon, saving time and resources. The fish is essentially Atlantic salmon with a Pacific salmon gene for faster growth and a gene from the eel-like ocean pout that promotes year-round growth.

AquaBounty developed the salmon by altering its genes so that it would grow faster than farmed salmon, and expects it will take about two more years to reach consumers’ plates as it works out distribution. AquaBounty is majority owned by Intrexon Corp, whose shares were up 7.3 percent at $37.55 in afternoon trading.

Activist groups have expressed concerns that genetically modified foods may pose risks to the environment or public health. Several on Thursday said they would oppose the sale of engineered salmon to the public, while some retailers said they would not carry the fish on store shelves.

Kroger Co, the nation’s largest traditional grocery chain, has “no intention of sourcing or selling genetically engineered salmon,” spokesman Keith Dailey said. Trader Joe’s and Whole Foods Market Inc also confirmed that they do not intend to carry the product.

Target Corp eliminated farm-raised salmon in favor of wild-caught salmon in 2010, which spokeswoman Molly Snyder said was the first step in a long-term commitment to improving the sustainability of our seafood assortment. “We are not currently planning to offer genetically engineered salmon,” Snyder said.

AquaBounty Chief Executive Ronald Stotish said the approval is “a game-changer that brings healthy and nutritious food to consumers in an environmentally responsible manner without damaging the ocean and other marine habitats.”

The approval for the fish, to be sold under the AquAdvantage brand, requires that the salmon be raised only in two designated land-based and contained hatcheries in Canada and Panama, and not in the United States. All of the fish will be female, and reproductively sterile, to prevent inadvertent breeding of the genetically modified fish with wild salmon, FDA officials said.

The agency on Thursday also issued draft guidelines on how food manufacturers could identify whether the salmon in their products are genetically modified. The guidelines state that such labeling would be voluntary.

Stotish said in an interview that AquaBounty will follow the FDA’s rule for labeling and currently “there would be no requirement for labeling.”

See on Scoop.itreNourishment

Want to Know What’s the “Wurst” In Your Hot Dog?

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For many consumers, dietary restrictions—some self-imposed, some medical, some religious—mean that food labels can make the difference between whether a sausage  makes it into the shopping bag or not. Vegetarian, Kosher, all-beef, turkey, chicken, lamb—there are innumerable categories and combinations of meaty and meatless sausages available today. With something as pulverized and reshaped as a sausage, how can one ever know what really lurks within that casing? And is the casing actually collagen, or is it pork or sheep intestine? Until now, consumers have had no option but to trust the labels.

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Recently, Clear Labs, leaders in the field of molecular food quality testing in the global food industry, introduced Clear Food, a consumer guide to food that is based on actual DNA analysis. The point is to analyze food at the molecular level with genomic analysis technology, then report the findings in a friendly format to help consumers differentiate between the quality of different top brands of commercial foods. Clear Labs has been collecting a database of food genetic markers, and believe that they have the most extensive collection in the world. Now they have tackled their first project: Hot dogs.

The results are a bit unsettling. Clear Food published an easy-to-read, informative report that starts with some facts and figures about hot dogs and sausages, describing how they are made, geographical variations, and yes, hot dog statistics.

Clear Labs, led by a team of some of the best scientists, genomicists and big data experts around, took 345 hot dog and sausage samples from 75 brands and 10 retailers, and performed high-level analyses of the contents. The results may make you want to  . . . well, lose your lunch.

In short, you may not be getting what you think you’re getting. And that goes beyond the fillers and “variety meats” we’ve all been warned about.

Upon examination, Clear Food found that 14.4 percent of the samples were adulterated with substitutions (for example, pork added to chicken and turkey hot dogs) and hygienic issues. In most cases the hygienic issues involved human DNA. Vegetarian products were particularly problematic, with 4 of 21 samples (about 20 percent) having hygienic issues. Two thirds of the vegetarian products contained human DNA, and their protein counts were sometimes padded by as much as by 250 percent. This means that when the label reports 25 grams of protein, the consumer may actually be getting only 10 grams.

The reports ends with ratings and recommendations: not surprising that they recommend known brands like Hebrew National (Kosher, of course), and Trader Joe’s received high marks for their vegetarian offerings.

As someone who has been sickened (literally) by mislabeled food, I find this to be of particular interest.

How do they test these products, and how do they calculate the results? That is at the bottom of the report, with links to more information. You can read the report here. And here’s a video that summarizes the results.

This report is only the beginning, and this type of testing could grow into something much bigger in scope. Testing for food-borne contaminants, like botulism in produce from massive commercial operations, or tainted CAFO meat, could be in the future and could save lives. Pesticide levels? The effects of chemical additives? The possibilities are intriguing.

Such thoughts certainly are a good reminder to know your farmer, and know your food. Sourcing well is extremely important, and if you can grow and make it yourself, so much the better. Mass production is no guarantee of food quality, safety and security, and we are learning that we need to turn away from the unsustainable practices behind much of what we consume today.

This testing is one important tool that can help individuals avoid the dangers of mislabeled foods, but it also has the potential to help educate consumers about what they should be eating, and how it should be produced.

I look forward to Clear Food’s next report.

~Until next time . . .

Researching Which Cod Liver Oil Weston A. Price Recommended

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Who knew that cod liver oil could be such a hot topic? Should it be fermented . . . or not fermented? There’s been a lot of unfortunate mud-slinging and accusations, organizations splitting, and a lot of confusion. Most people involved in this uproar seem to be floundering because the bigger question is being completely overlooked: What did Dr. Weston A. Price actually have to say on the subject? What did he use himself, and what did he recommend for others?

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I have a special interest in this because of an opportunity I was given to research the topic using Dr. Price’s own unpublished material. His numerous studies related to cod liver oil spanned several decades, and many of these documents are safely housed with the Price-Pottenger Nutrition Foundation (PPNF).

Some of my work involves research and writing on nutrition and health-related topics for Vision.org and for PPNF. In 2014, I was asked by PPNF to research some material in Dr. Price’s unpublished manuscripts. The project is on-going, and spending months poring over his work has been quite revealing for me, raising some important questions. And yes, some of those questions lie at the heart of the current cod liver oil debate.

But the story really began years ago, when I attended my first Culture Club 101 Real Food Symposium, heard the discussions about fermented cod liver oil and met the person behind it. The reasoning seemed sound on the surface, so I looked into it a little and even took some of the fermented oil myself.

I wanted to learn more about it and began to cast a wider net, looking more deeply into the issues. There was much available that seemed contradictory, so I was very curious to see what Dr. Price learned.

With the opportunity I was given to review his unpublished work, suddenly I had access to far more information than just what I could find through public sources. And it was eye-opening.

One obvious question that kept surfacing was this: “What kind of cod liver oil did Dr. Price himself use and recommend?” Because of the research I was doing for PPNF (with original material from Dr. Price), I was able to delve into the task of finding the answer. I wanted to know the truth, and the facts were all there. Clues from across the centuries appeared, and the archivist and others at PPNF found more related information, sometimes in the handwriting of Dr. Price himself. And then one day it all came together. I couldn’t believe it—this was huge. Now there was no more doubt about what kind of cod liver oil Dr. Price recommended.

Yet I kept seeing well-meaning bloggers and others claim that Dr. Price recommended this or that—and I knew first-hand that these comments were somewhat misleading . . . actually, some were dead wrong.

I had also studied enough of Dr. Price’s unpublished work to know that the right kind of cod liver oil in the right amount was good—very good. But the wrong type and the wrong dose can cause headaches, paralysis, heart problems and even death. All this misinformation being put forth—again, by well-meaning but misinformed commenters and others—could have serious health consequences for those who innocently followed bad recommendations (even with good intentions).

Clearly, it was time for a much-needed article on this very important subject. Those at PPNF gathered all the data from Price’s documents and other works, and have published this information in the Summer 2015 issue of the Price-Pottenger Journal of Health and Healing.

I’m grateful for the opportunity I’ve had to look into this using the original sources, and I’m grateful that the caring people at PPNF are willing to share this information with the general public.

Concerned, health-conscious people are asking a lot of questions about this. If you want PPNF’s free e-book on what Dr. Price had to say about cod liver oil, just sign up on their home page: http://ppnf.org/

If you would like to read the entire article in the Journal online, here’s the link for PPNF members: http://ppnf.org/summer-2015-journal/

And here’s the article in a blog post dealing with this topic (accessible by non-PPNF members): http://blog.ppnf.org/cod-liver-oil-a-historical-perspective/

Well, there’s the story behind the article. Hope it helps you make informed decisions about what to share with your loved ones.

Until next time~

Supergrain Kernza Could Save Our Soil and Feed the World . . . But Is it Helpful—or Harmful?

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Kernza’s arrival has been a long time coming. The new grain variety from the Land Institute is derived from an ancient form of intermediate wheatgrass, a perennial that is actually a distant relative of wheat.

Sourced from: civileats.com

Kernza is a perennial grain, meaning it can be grown year-round, with roots that live on in the ground through winter. Corn, wheat, and most of the other grains we eat, on the other hand, are annual crops, which must be replanted anew every year, and “require” seeds, fertilizers, and pesticides for each planting. But Kernza’s most important difference–and the reason so many people have been waiting for its arrival–is the way it interacts with the soil.

Because its root system is dense, growing down into the earth up to 10 feet, Kernza can respond to shifts in soil and temperature quickly, taking in water, nitrogen, and phosphorous. Annual wheat doesn’t live long enough to develop thick roots, and requires soil tilling before each planting. But Kernza’s roots hold soil in place, preventing erosion. This is especially crucial in the farm belt, where rain washes significant quantities of soil and dissolved nitrogen into waterways, and eventually to the Gulf of Mexico. The Environmental Working Group estimates that 10 million acres of Iowa farmland lost dangerous amounts of soil in 2007.

That’s not all. Kernza also “builds soil quality and takes CO2 out of the atmosphere, which may help with mitigating climate change,” says Land Institute scientist Lee DeHaan, the driving force behind Kernza.
But will this nutrient-dense, high-protein and lower-gluten grain be an answer to all the problems with today’s grains, or will it prove to be another idea that “seemed good at the time?”

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